Total Knee Replacement

Total knee replacement surgery is the replacement of both sides of a knee joint that is worn out or diseased. This may be needed to treat a number of issues that have damaged the joint such as osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.

The surgical procedure is open surgery, meaning larger incisions will be made to enable best possible access to the area. Metal and plastic artificial prosthetics will replace the bottom of the femur (thigh bone), the top of the tibia (shin bone), and behind the patella (knee cap). There are low rates of complications and recovery time is around 6 weeks for day to day activities, with a 12-month time estimate for total recovery.

Partial Knee Replacement

Partial knee replacement is the replacement of only one compartment (inner or outer) of the knee that has been affected by arthritis. A patient is only suitable for a partial knee replacement if the disease is confined to one area of the knee, otherwise a full knee replacement would be recommended.

This surgery is done through small incisions and the damaged parts are replaced with metal and plastic prosthetics. Patients can generally walk without assistance approximately 3 weeks after surgery and full recovery is estimated after 6 months. Complication rates are very low.

ACL Repair

ACL repair is the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, a major ligament that is required to stabilise the knee. This procedure is considered for those that have sustained a complete tear with ensuing instability. This is a common injury for athletes who participate in sports that involve twisting and jarring of the knee, for example football or netball.

The procedure is done arthroscopically through small incisions, with a new ligament being constructed out of a graft from either the hamstring or the patella tendon which is fixed to the femur and tibia. It will take approximately 6-9 months until sports are able to be returned to, though most find it will be 10-12 months before they feel they are fully ready to return.

Knee Arthroscopy

Knee arthroscopy is a minimally invasive technique that is used to treat a number of issues within the knee joint using a tiny camera called an arthroscope. This procedure can be used to treat several conditions including meniscal tears and loose bodies.

The procedure is conducted via small incisions through which the arthroscope and other instruments needed are passed. As the surgery is minimally invasive, the recovery time is around 6 weeks for full function to be returned and most patients notice inflammation for 3-6 months.

Patello-Femoral Replacement

Patello-femoral replacement is the removal and replacement of the back of a damaged patella (knee cap) and the adjacent area at the front of the femur. Patients are considered for this procedure when arthritis is confined to the patello-femoral compartment.

The operation is performed open, removing the damaged surface of the knee cap and replacing it with an artificial implant. Whilst full weight can be placed on the knee, assistance by a walker or crutches will be used for the first few weeks post-surgery.